Is My Tooth Enamel Eroding?

Enamel Erosion

The enamel – the outermost mineral layer of the tooth that protects the deeper dental tissues against contacts with the exterior world – is in constant erosion. The food residues, especially the residues that come from sugary foods and remain in the mouth for a long time and the residues that come from sugary beverages and acidulous fruit juices are transformed by the bacteria naturally dwelling in the oral cavity into acids that attack the enamel by depriving it of the minerals that give the enamel its strength.

The body can counter the erosion process to a certain extent by re-mineralizing the enamel using the mineral supplies available from the food consumed, but too much sugar leads to too much acid and the body might be unable to counter the harm – that is when cavities appear.

The simplest, easiest and most efficient way to help the enamel of the tooth resist erosion is with the help of regular and thorough cleaning. Brush your teeth two times a day, with a mild or medium brush and a fluoride toothpaste, floss at least once a day and use an anti-bacterial mouthwash each time you brush. Try to avoid sugary and acidulous foods and beverages as much as you can and get your teeth checked regularly by your lone tree dentists to identify the signs of erosion when they are still easy to treat.