Family Dentistry services for a lifelong healthy smile for you and your family. Serving families in Lone Tree, Denver, and Highlands Ranch.

How well do you know your teeth?

How well do you know your teeth?

  1. How many primary (baby) teeth are there?
    1. There are 20 primary teeth. Children tend to get them starting at age 6 months and they may continue erupting until about 6 years old. Primary teeth help children learn to speak, chew and also act as placeholders for the permanent teeth.
  2. How many permanent teeth are there?
    1. There are 32 permanent teeth, including wisdom teeth. They are numbered 1 – 16 on the top (starting on your upper right) and 17 – 32 on the bottom (starting on your lower left). Your wisdom teeth are numbered 1, 16, 17, and 32.
  3. Do we lose all 20 primary (baby) teeth?
    1. Yes, we lose all 20 of our primary teeth by about the age of 12 or 13. By this age, most people will have all of their permanent teeth (with the exception of wisdom teeth).
  4. Do we lose our “baby” molars?
    1. Yes. We get our first primary molars around 12 – 19 months and then our second primary molars around 23 – 33 months (upper and lower teeth vary). Most people lose the first primary molars around age 9 – 11 and then the second primary molars around age 10 – 12.
  5. What about permanent molars?
    1. Molars are the first permanent teeth that don’t replace a primary tooth. There are 3 sets of permanent molars—the first are 6-year molars, the second are 12-year molars and the third are the wisdom teeth (often referred to as 3rds). Wisdom teeth usually erupt between the age of 15 – 25 (or may not erupt at all) and actually got their name because a person is generally “wiser” and more mature at that age.
  6. Why are wisdom teeth removed?
    1. Wisdom teeth are often removed because there may not be enough space in the mouth. In addition to making the mouth crowded, they can make it difficult to maintain good oral hygiene due to the difficulty of properly brushing and flossing so far back.
  7. What are premolars?
    1. Premolars, also known as bicuspids, are adjacent to your molars. They are not as large and have only 2 cusps (points) instead of 4. There are 2 sets of premolars—the first and second—and they replace the baby molars when they fall out.
  8. Why are the canine teeth called that?
    1. Just as you would imagine, our canine teeth are called that because they are similar to those of a dog’s and have the same purpose for biting and tearing food. They also look similar with their long, pointed shape.